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Displaying posts with tag: Microsoft

Thoughts on Ballmer, the Consumerization of IT, and Platforms

Thoughts on Ballmer, the Consumerization of IT, and Platforms

In the book, I write about the cardinal importance of the Consumerization of IT. In short, it's been huge.

Think about that in the context of the forthcoming retirement of Steve Ballmer. As Derek Thompson writes in The Atlantic:

Steve Ballmer made some very bad things. But his tenure will probably be judged by the

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Amazon and Frenemies

Amazon and Frenemies

The Age of the Platform is causing some interesting ripples, and not just with consumers.

The enterprise is starting to pay attention to the threat posed by the Gang of Four.

Exhibit A: Oracle's new partnership with Microsoft.

I for one never thought that Steve Ballmer and Larry Ellison would walk down any type of aisle, but these

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Let He Who Is Without Sin Cast The First Stone

Let He Who Is Without Sin Cast The First Stone

From a recent ComputerWorld piece:

Microsoft yesterday confirmed that a retail copy of Office 2013 is permanently tied to the first PC on which it's installed, preventing customers from deleting the suite from one machine they own and installing it on another.

The move is a change from past Office end-user licensing agreements

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If All Else Fails, Smear

If All Else Fails, Smear

Microsoft is back at it with its Google smear campaign. Google employees are reading individual emails to serve up better ads.

Or so Ballmer et. al would have you believe.

Bullocks!

To my knowledge, Google employees don't read any Gmail messages. Rather, algorithms serve up ads to support free products. This is the essence of the freemium model.

Do

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Should Google Be Scared?

Should Google Be Scared?

When will social search replace index search in the future--and will Google be prepared for it?

We still don't know the answer to the first question, but we got a glimpse yesterday. By all accounts, Graph Search is in very, very early beta. It's nowhere near ready for prime time. Yet, something tells me that the

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On Platforms and Whining

On Platforms and Whining

I wrote yesterday about Microsoft's whining about Google's paid search results.

I find it interesting that competitors of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google are so vocal. For the most part, the Gang of Four just focuses on building better products and offering better services. Sure, Larry Page complains about Facebook's walled garden. Apple pulled Google's maps

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On Scroogled and Hypocrisy

On Scroogled and Hypocrisy

Microsoft has taken to "educating" consumers on Google's holiday search practices. Yes, there's even a website devoted to this "public service." Microsoft is trying to bill itself as the voice of the uninformed masses. In this fictional world, Bing provides true, unfettered, pure results.

This is just lame. Microsoft can't beat Google at search so the

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Is the Microsoft Surface a Failure?

Is the Microsoft Surface a Failure?

Is the Surface a failure? Some people seem to think so. I for one find it curious that Microsoft isn't releasing sales numbers for the device--and I'm hardly alone here. 

Not so long ago, Microsoft used to own the enterprise. Everyone used Windows and Office. Big and small companies--and everyone in between. Public and private

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The Gradually Closing Platform Strategy

The Gradually Closing Platform Strategy

Mathew Ingram of GigaOM writes a fascinating piece about the increasing tensions among Twitter, Facebook, and their respective ecosystems. But why the bad blood?

It turns out that Facebook and Twitter are closing their platforms more and more. In each case, platforms there were previously open and democratic are now becoming restrictive and closed. StockTwits was

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Office 2013: Do You Care?

Office 2013: Do You Care?

Most office types use Microsoft office because they have to, not because they want to. A Wired story confirms what I've long suspected. Forget Microsoft's other lines of business. Office alone is enormous. Microsoft "holds more than 90 percent of the business productivity software market." This results in more than $20 billion in annual sales.

20

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